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We are Open!

Due to the spread of the corona virus our office is taking extra precautions to keep our patients safe. We want our patients to feel safe coming to our office. We are screening each patient that comes in, disinfecting our waiting area and back office as usual, as well as keeping the wait time down in the waiting area. We will continue to see patients in the office and please don’t hesitate to call if you have any questions.
We are now accepting Telehealth appointments, please give the office a call for details.

Items filtered by date: August 2020

Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Published in Blog
Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

Caring for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

We should all be wary of cuts, scrapes, and wounds on our feet, but diabetics need to be especially careful. Diabetic foot ulcers are open sores or wounds that form mainly on the bottoms of the feet of people with diabetes. These wounds are slow to heal and may become infected. Therefore, it is important for diabetics to take special care of their feet. Daily inspections of the feet to check for scrapes, sores, and blisters, can help detect any problems early on. If you find an open wound, wash it well with saline or clean tap water, then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound. Cover the wound with a bandage to protect it, and change the bandage every one to two days, making sure to clean and disinfect the wound again. Keep pressure off the wound as much as you can to aid in healing. If you have diabetes and struggle with diabetic foot ulcers, see a podiatrist who can help you take care of your feet.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. James Kutchback from James Kutchback, DPM, ABLES, CWS-P. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in The Woodlands and Woodville, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 24 August 2020 00:00

Possible Causes of Ingrown Toenails

The big toe is often affected if an ingrown toenail occurs. It can happen as a result of wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in, or if the toenails are not trimmed properly. Common symptoms that many patients experience can include redness, swelling, and pain when the toe is touched. Additionally, in severe cases, pus may ooze from the affected area. The toe may feel better when shoes that fit properly are worn, and it may help to soak the toe in warm water. This can be beneficial in pushing the skin away from the ingrown toenail, which may provide temporary relief. If you are afflicted with this type of foot condition, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can effectively treat this condition.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact Dr. James Kutchback of James Kutchback, DPM, ABLES, CWS-P. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in The Woodlands and Woodville, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 17 August 2020 00:00

Exercises for Heel Spur Pain

Heel spurs are bony growths on the bottom of the heel bone. Though they are usually painless, they can cause or worsen the pain of other foot conditions such as plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendonitis. There are several exercises you can do to prevent or reduce the pain of a heel spur. You may try an exercise called Heel Ups, where you place a tennis ball between the heels and hold the ball in place by squeezing the heels together. You then rise up on your toes and come back down several times while keeping the ball in place. Another exercise that you can do is a Soleus Stretch, where you stand facing a wall and place your foot up against it, bend your knee, and lean forward until you feel a stretch in your calf. For more information about heel spurs, speak with a podiatrist today.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact Dr. James Kutchback from James Kutchback, DPM, ABLES, CWS-P. Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our offices located in The Woodlands and Woodville, TX. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Published in Blog
Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Published in Blog
Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

The Severity Levels of Sprained Ankles

Sprained ankles are an extremely common injury among athletes and are a result of ligaments in the ankle being overstretched or torn during activity. Sprains can be mild, moderate, or severe. A mild sprain, sometimes referred to as a Grade 1 sprain, is characterized by overstretched ligaments and possible microscopic tears which can cause mild pain, swelling, and light bruising. A moderate sprain, called a Grade 2 sprain, is characterized by partial tearing in the ligaments and abnormal looseness of the joint, moderate pain, noticeable swelling, moderate bruising, and joint instability during weight-bearing activities. The most severe type of sprain, a Grade 3, is characterized by a complete tear of the ligaments, causing intense pain, significant swelling, severe bruising, and major joint instability. If you have sprained your ankle, it is strongly recommended that you seek out a podiatrist for treatment.

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact Dr. James Kutchback of James Kutchback, DPM, ABLES, CWS-P. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in The Woodlands and Woodville, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Published in Blog

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition that causes poor circulation to the lower extremities due to a buildup of arterial plaque. Common symptoms include painful leg cramps, especially after walking, and leg and foot numbness and weakness. Having PAD can increase your risk of heart attack and stroke, which makes diagnosing and treating this condition a top priority. For PAD patients, doctors often recommend lifestyle modifications to manage symptoms and reduce the risk of having a stroke or heart attack. These modifications may include quitting smoking, changing your diet to lower your cholesterol, controlling hypertension and diabetes through medications, and exercising. Treatment options for PAD differ based on the severity of the disease. A doctor might recommend an exercise regimen to increase mobility and medications to improve circulation and reduce pain. Consult with a podiatrist to find the treatments and management strategies that are right for you.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. James Kutchback from James Kutchback, DPM, ABLES, CWS-P. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in The Woodlands and Woodville, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Published in Blog